Under the Surface

Under the Surface

By Sue Ellson

Under the Surface by Sue Ellson

Florence Falls, Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory, Australia

 

Under the surface
Below what you can see
A heart that has been hurt
It belongs to me

Under the surface
Where no one can hear
A voice that has been silenced
It belongs to me

Under the surface
The mouth that won’t open
A tongue that won’t taste
It belongs to me

Under the surface
There’s a scent that won’t fade
A smell that lingers
It belongs to me

Under the surface
Feelings I fight or try to flee
Trapped in a body
They belong to me

Deep in the water
A belief in the good
The faith to be free
It belongs to me

Deep in the water
A light that keeps shining
The hope to see
It belongs to me

Deep in the water
A warmth that comforts
The love to be
It belongs to me

Today, the 14th of December 2017, I watched a documentary that only told the story of victims – but not of how the survivors could move forward in life.

In my view, it is time for journalists to not only ‘tell the story,’ and raise awareness about particular issues that need to be addressed and leave some phone numbers to call if you have concerns, but to actually provide details of how victims have found solutions, both here and in other countries, to the particular issue being highlighted so that when old wounds are opened, they can be treated immediately.

A social imperative. Investigative and restorative journalism.

On a personal note, 2017 has seen me deal with a range of losses – some small, some large and it has left me contemplative about not only my own range of feelings ‘under the surface,’ that I receive through my five senses, but also acutely aware of how many brave souls face challenges every day through faith, hope and love.

My hope is that this short piece provides some comfort for you and your past losses, especially as we approach the end of year festivities. Inner faith, hope and love can conquer so much – but if they are not enough for you, please be courageous enough to ask for some additional support.

Interestingly, I find that many people respond more openly and willingly to a tragedy or crisis than everyday challenges – but that is not a reason to ignore any underlying issues that can magnify the impact of minor difficulties – especially if you feel as if you cannot discuss it openly without consequence.

With love, Sue Ellson 🙂

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